Home > Selling a home, Uncategorized > Realtor Expectations – Part One: THE LISTING AGENT

Realtor Expectations – Part One: THE LISTING AGENT

NOTE:  This is a pretty long post but worth reading – print it out.

With so many Realtors to choose from, this is intended to help you look at some of the things you might want to clarify with an agent when selecting the one to sell your house.  Realtors, like any group of people, have many different styles, work ethics, and philosophies.

There are a lot of homes on the market today – some sell, some don’t.   Working with the right Realtor can definitely have an impact on which group your home falls in to.

Every Realtor should have the same objective when listing your home.   The objective, put simply, is this: To help you sell for the highest possible price, in the shortest amount of time, with the least amount of inconvenience for you.

This  objective should be the basis for everything else in the Realtor’s Strategy:  Highest – Shortest – Least  or HSL.

Every plan and every action should be geared towards one of those three components.

PRICING: A Realtor’s first responsibility to you is to help you decide the right asking price.

You agent should perform a detailed analysis for you of your local market, including sold properties, active listings, properties that did not sell, as well as information on how many homes have sold in your areas recently and the pricing trends.

Once you know the right price, it is the responsibility of the Realtor to advise you not to overprice your house.   Why  you should not overprice your home is covered in THIS POST.  The subject at hand today is that your Realtor should not be telling you what you want to hear. Brutal honesty should gets high marks.

The tendency for many sellers is to ask about listing above market value for  “a while” and then lower it if doesn’t sell.  Doing this is rarely in the best interest of the seller and usually ends up with months of anxiety and ultimately nets the seller less money for their home.  Look for a Realtor who will stand by his analysis and work with you towards HSL.  It may be the path of least resistance for a Realtor to simply go along with the client on this issue – but it may not be the best thing for the client.

MARKETING: I’ve heard it said that no one “sells” a house, people look at at and choose to buy it.  If that’s true then the key to finding that buyer is to get as many people to look at the house as possible.  Not everyone that views your home is going to want to buy it – that’s OK.  You only need one buyer.  The odds of finding that buyer are greatly increased by the Realtor’s ability to generate interest.    Ask your Realtor for his Marketing Plan.  What are the specifics thing he’ll be doing.  What will be done in the first few days, the first week, the second week.  What will be done on an ongoing basis.

How will he be promoting the home to the other Realtors in the area?   Remember, it’s the other Realtors who have the buyers.  So  while advertising your home to consumers is important, it is equally important to know the specifics of how your Realtor will be communicating with the other area Realtors – or even Realtors not in your area.  Your buyer may live  down the street or thousands of miles away.  In our area of Northern Fairfield county, there are multitudes of folks who move across the state line from NY.  How will your Realtor approach the NY Realtors with information about your listing?

Part of  the marketing plan includes preparing your home for showings.  This may include staging advice, which again calls for brutal honesty.  For certain homes, it might be appropriate to bring in a professional home stager, but  even without that there will be things that your Realtor will likely notice that will make your house more appealing to buyers.  Again, what you want here is for the Realtor to look beyond saying what’s comfortable – he needs to point out anything he notices to you that will help reach the prime objective.

In addition your Realtor should make a point of preparing marketing materials for your home that will point out “the high points” to visitors.  Remember – neither you nor your Realtor will likely be present during showings and the buyer’s Realtor does not know as much about your home as you or your own Realtor.  “Call outs” which are small signs can be placed throughout the house to draw attention to certain features.  If there’s a cedar closet for example, buyers will only see it if they open and look inside – so a small sign on the outside of the closet can help.

There are a variety of other materials that can be placed in the house, co-located with the agent sign-in sheets.  Property and subdivision maps, neighborhood information and transportation options are just a few.

FEEDBACK: Ask yourself how often you want updates from your Realtor about  “what’s going on”.   Will your Realtor provide weekly written summaries of all showings and re-showings of your house?   What is the Realtor’s plan for following up with the agents who bring buyers for showings?   With today’s electronic key boxes, your Realtor can have the capability of knowing very quickly what other Realtors showed your home.  Does he have a systematic plan to get feedback and follow up with them?

NEGOTIATION: Your Realtor should have a negotiation strategy which he goes over with you before the house is ever shown.  While he will bring you all offers and you will ultimately decide,  he should be discussing likely contingencies and options with you.  When an offer comes in, it begins a series of fast paced back and forth telephone conversations that should lead you to a successful sale. If you’ve discussed the strategy in advance, you’ll be prepared for and can come up with well thought out positions on things such as:

  • What will you do if you get a full priced offer on the first day of the listing – before you’ve had an open house?
  • What are your options if you get multiple offers?
  • How should you respond to “lowball” offers?
  • What if you get an offer form someone who has a healthy down-payment but needs an extended closing date?

None of these things should be surprises if and when they come up.

POST SALE: Once an offer is accepted, the primary point of contact will likely be your attorney but that, by no means, says that your Realtor’s responsibility is over.  Your agent should be prepared to follow up with all the various parties to make sure that everyone else is doing everything they are supposed to.  There is an old adage among sales people  that applies here:   “A salesperson’s job begins when the buyer says yes”.   Everything that happened prior to your finding a buyer will mean nothing if the deal falls through.  There are many things over which you or your Realtor have no control, but he can stay informed and at least try to avert any one of the many things that can go wrong.

SUMMARY: Generally speaking, you should choose someone you feel comfortable with but that comfort should come from you knowing that your Realtor has a plan which involved more than taking the listing and waiting for the buyers to come.

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